I'm a 30-something married lesbian with a thing for literary fiction and historical novels. But I'm also having a pretty torrid affair with gritty noir and some paranormal/supernatural fiction. I love interesting heroines, gorgeous prose, place as character, and the occasional werewolf.

You can email me at unabridgedchick at gmail.com

Reviews, book giveaways, and author interviews at www.unabridgedchick.com

 

Battling Clichés & Tired, Old Tropes: Foreigners as Food

VIP boxes and seven-figure advances: How fiction gets the publishing industry laughably wrong

I adore how snarky Salon is about this book.

I’m having a Kate Quinn summer (for what is left of the summer, at least!).  Ancient Rome and decadent Borgias — what’s not to love??

I’m having a Kate Quinn summer (for what is left of the summer, at least!).  Ancient Rome and decadent Borgias — what’s not to love??

Sending a few books to another blogger.  Reminding myself the space I’ve made is for baby stuff & not more books…

Sending a few books to another blogger. Reminding myself the space I’ve made is for baby stuff & not more books…

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

Raymond Chandler and Frank Partos’s revised script for And Now Tomorrow, Paramount, 1943.

One of only five screenplays written by Chandler, this being the second, following his script for the classic “Double Indemnity” (1944), based on James M. Cain’s novel. 


Chandler had a tumultuous career in Hollywood, including a suspension in late 1945 from Paramount for “refusing to perform under a contract which is not a proper expression of my standing in the motion picture business,” but his influence on film adaptation is nearly unmatched, with scripts and stories that pushed the limits of the Production Code Administration.

Unless you’re Christopher Hitchens, who can write about dying while you’re dying, I think most writers need some distance from their calamities. I suppose I was being a quiet American on that cruise ship—amid three thousand passengers—and in that contemplative space the spectre of my mother’s death transformed itself into a story.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh discusses his short story in this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1trtYKP (via newyorker)

A Few Tips and Resources for Writing Characters of Color

writeworld:

The simple, honest answer is that you need to be very careful because you have never been a POC and therefore are in danger of portraying a group of people insensitively, unfairly,…

Being published is not a necessary validation or a path everyone wants to take with their work. Writing—and finishing—a novel is a great thing in itself, whether or not the book is published, or becomes widely-read or not.